New Media & ICT’s

One of the most important factors, I believe, when integrating ICT’s to the classroom environment is that of meta-cognition. In this new and emerging digital age, it can be sometimes overwhelming for a teacher to come to grips not only with researching, learning about and employing new media. However, it is just as important to consider the ways in which these tools can be used to create meta-cognition….after all, only using an Interactive White Board as a projector is really a “dumbing down” of the technology.

For myself, I know there is still alot of learning to be done, before I can hope to fully integrate the multitude of new technologies in a quality learning environment, but there is light at the end of the tunnel, and part of that is the realisation that the learning will be continuous. As much as one can learn now about ICT’s available, there will only be more devices, more applications to come, so I feel that it is a commitment to fully enter the digital age that is required for us as educators.

Schools, Teachers and Education systems that try to simply incorporate some ICT to meet standards will be left behind, and indeed, are doing themselves a disservice, as this “new world” is faster, more interactive, and more engaging for students. In my teaching studies I have been introduced to many exciting new media concepts, alot of which really emphasise collaboration, and meta-cognition; however on my practicums so far I have seen little evidence of ICT’s being more than projection, or processing tools. I found the Blooms Digital Taxonomy to be very helpful in equating the different levels of cognition with ICT tools and applications…it seemed to make clear just how these different tools can be used to achieve all levels of thinking, including the higher ones of analysing, evaluation, and creation.The included rubrics were most helpful!!

This links to a most valuable resourse!

http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Bloom%27s+Digital+Taxonomy

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3 responses to “New Media & ICT’s

  1. Hi Zoe, i really enjoyed reading over your blog! I have even booked marked some of the links you have posted in my favourites, they are great resources. Thank you so much for all the research you have provided. You have raised some amazing points in your latest blog. I particularly found the sentence “only using an interactive white board as a projector is really a dumbing down of the technology” quiet a strong statement which i hope more people acknowledge. It’s amazing how many educators don’t fully utilise the technology that so many others aren’t fortunate to have to their full potential. The amount of teachers i have seen over both my practicum’s utilising it in a similar way for PowerPoint’s presentations and video’s. In saying that though i have also seen at lot of educators trying new things on interactive white boards, one for example which i found extremely useful was when a teacher connected a USB microscope to the interactive white board to enlarge the slide of a real life cell (yes I know using it as a projector, but bare with me). The students had recently covered the different organelles found in different cells. After connecting the USB microscope the teacher asked different students to come up to the interactive white board and label the different organelles found in the real life cells by drawing an arrow to the organelle and writing it up above it. The Students were fully engaged and i loved how there were applying there recently learnt knowledge to a real life component. Which is what i think bloom is getting at in his ‘Digital Taxonomy’ by learning the fundamentals first in theory and then applying them to a more advanced concept, which required a higher order of thinking where the students were analysing the image of the real life cell and its organelles and having to evaluate which components were which. I thought that use of the interactive white board was very interesting. Still only using very little of its full potential but at least it’s a start.

    • thanks for your comments…I have to admit, until now, the only way I have used an IWB is in the “dumbed down” way….”not that there’s anything wrong with that!” (think Seinfeld) and as way to engage visual learners it is amazing…and of course for Visual Arts, my specialization it’s fantastic at producing big bright images. I just know that there is soooo much more, and the above piece of writing was a challenge to myself, as well as others…I’m gonna do every professional development day possible to do with ICT’s when teaching, as I’m the kind of learner who needs to be shown how to do something, although, there are great youtube tutorials on almost anything!

  2. Thanks for your post Zoe!

    There are two comments in your post that stood out with me, in particular: “only using an interactive white board as a projector is really a dumbing down of the technology” and “As much as one can learn now about ICT’s available, there will only be more devices, more applications to come”.

    Firstly I agree whole heartedly about IWB’s being used as a projector. I completed a prac at a school that considered themselves ‘modern’ in their use of technology. However, only one teacher used it for more than a glorified overhead projector! It is a shame that the technology is there but maybe not being utilised to its full extent.

    I guess this moves onto the second comment in that people may not feel the desire to learn about technology as it is moving so fast that, as soon as they have mastered one device a new one is on its way! I guess its about having confidence to trial new things and not to be afraid of the technology available?

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